Macron and Austerity: episode CCLII. Old Socialist comments

Should the reader take this as the battle-cry for Macron’s Jupertarian Revolution?

“This government seems to be intent on tackling all the French sacred cows,” said Isabelle Mateos y Lago, global macro investment strategist in the BlackRock Investment Institute. “It’s seeking to neutralise opposition by conducting reforms at a rapid pace.”

https://www.ft.com/content/bc70a228-2161-11e8-a895-1ba1f72c2c11

BlackRock Investment Institute ? Another group of profiteers, under the cover of the descriptor redolent of the pseudo-academic – see  Edward L. Bernays in his 1928 Public Relations manifesto ‘Propaganda’ –  ready to take advantage of Macron’s Revolution by The 37% ? Ms. Mateos y Lago carefully frames her argument in the blandest of terms: ‘“It’s seeking to neutralise opposition by conducting reforms at a rapid pace.”’  this redolent of the bland rhetoric of the CIA’s rationalizations for its myriad crimes.

Ms. Mateos y Lago: what of those rolling strikes? That have the support of 44% of the French electorate?

Another voice of ‘Neo-Liberal Reason’ is heard:

“It’s not just the unions — Macron wants to take on the vested interests that he views as the main obstacles to reforming the country in the past three decades; he wants to eradicate the privileges of insiders,” said Bruno Cautrès, a political analyst at Sciences Po Cevipof institute.

The ‘vested interests’ the callobos with the Evil of the Unions! ‘Reform’ is  Neo-Liberalization! Austerity in its various iterations for those lesser beings, meaning Workers,  and the permission for Capital to exploit those Workers. And drive both the Economy and those lesser beings into penury, is the proven end-point of this ‘Reform’! The stark object lessons of both America and Britain somehow eludes Ms. Mateos y Lago, or that state of self-willed ignorance is the singularity that defines her employment.

Again Ms. Mateos y Lago makes another appearance to assure the reader that Macron is:

“He wants to shake up the unions but he’s no Margaret Thatcher,” said Ms Mateos y Lago, referring to the former British prime minister who was the nemesis of unions in the UK. She pointed out that Mr Macron’s solutions involve more public sector oversight of welfare. “The state tends to take over, which is consistent with French history and culture. And he’s moving [unions’] role down to the companies. It’s a game where unions have things to win,” she said.

These assurances from Ms Mateos y Lago, think tank propagandist,of the near benign character of Macronism,  act as an introduction to this ‘news story’:

Headline: French deficit falls below EU limit for first time in decade

Sub-headline: Figures lend weight to Macron’s campaign for overhaul of eurozone economy

Bruno Le Maire, finance minister announces that the French deficit is now below the 3% level set by the EU. An EU fully controlled by four time defaulter Germany and its capo the ECB. The stark object lesson of the Greeks is prima facae evidence of this alliances utter self-serving mendacity and corrupt power. A fact that both Ms Mateos y Lago and Macron and his ally Bruno Le Maire would find utterly inconvenient to the fact and the narrative of their ‘Reform’. A Financial Times essay by Gillian Tett provides some necessary insights:

Headline: A debt to history?

Sub-headline: To some, Germany faces a moral duty to help Greece, given the aid that it has previously enjoyed

https://www.ft.com/content/927efd1e-9c32-11e4-b9f8-00144feabdc0

Some telling quotations from this ‘news story’ by Harriet Agnew:

Bruno Le Maire, finance minister, told Franceinfo radio, that the figures are “good news” and argued that they proved the president’s strategy correct. Despite the shrinking deficit, public debt increased from 96.6 per cent of GDP at the end of 2016 to 97 per cent of GDP at the end of 2017, according to Insee.

Mr Le Maire described debt reduction as a “priority objective”, adding: “When I see the situation of hospitals, I would like to spend less where it is less necessary to help our healthcare system and the French who need it most.”

Mr Macron has pledged to bring an end to France’s persistent flouting of EU budget rules, seeking to burnish Paris’s European credentials and gain credibility in Berlin and Brussels for his plans for ambitious eurozone reform. “It helps us get back our credibility in Europe,” Mr Le Maire said. “Today, when the president speaks in Europe, he is listened to and respected.”

In his first budget in October, Mr Macron promised a series of pro-business reforms including a flat tax on dividends and slashing the wealth tax to attract investment. The figures Insee released on Monday showed an improvement on the revenue side.

https://www.ft.com/content/53ef664c-30d6-11e8-b5bf-23cb17fd1498

The regular reader of this newspaper/propaganda sheet finds none of this Neo-Liberal advocacy a surprise. Even though that closely held belief in The Self Correcting Market has yet to manifest itself, to put it in the passive voice. The French electorate, that abstained by a near a near 37%, and the  Unions have shown with their ‘rolling strikes’ that the Jupertarian Politics of Macron are going to be of a piecemeal kind?  The fact that the collapse of the Neo-Liberal dogmas, in both Britain and America, has led directly to the Populism that The Financial Times inveighs against in almost every issue, and makes plain that the denial of causality is the sine qua non of propaganda.

Old Socialist

 

@gaston lagaffe @StephenKMackSD

Thank you for your comment. Can you read? besides the above quote, here is more of the BlackRock Investment Institute think tank’s Ms. Mateos y Lago, trying to soften the blow, he’s no Margaret Thatcher, as the good political apologist is wont to do. Perhaps ‘He is not Hayek’ would have served as well ? As a matter of the establishment of some ersatz independence from the Macron Neo-Liberal Swindle:

“He wants to shake up the unions but he’s no Margaret Thatcher,” said Ms Mateos y Lago, referring to the former British prime minister who was the nemesis of unions in the UK. She pointed out that Mr Macron’s solutions involve more public sector oversight of welfare. “The state tends to take over, which is consistent with French history and culture. And he’s moving [unions’] role down to the companies. It’s a game where unions have things to win,” she said.

As I have stated, if you read the whole of my comment, perhaps if you haven’t, take the time to do so. I have provided the link. As for the notion of ‘fairness’ when the Macron opposition is given this:

The unexpected twist “has eroded trust”, Yvan Ricordeau, a CFDT negotiator, told the Financial Times.

The CFDT’s Mr Ricordeau admitted: “The pace [of reforms] is unabated, but we knew this would be case beforehand.”

He added: “We got prepared for it.”

“The negotiation method (for pensions) will be crucial, because we know that if it’s wrong, it’s going to create frictions,” Mr Ricordeau said.

Speak to me of fairness!

Regards,

StephenKMackSD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About stephenkmacksd

Rootless cosmopolitan,down at heels intellectual;would be writer.
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